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Crowdfunding campaigns are nerve-wracking!
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ttallan
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Joined: 28 Feb 2008
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:16 pm    Post subject: Crowdfunding campaigns are nerve-wracking! Reply with quote

Or maybe it's just me. We finally started our Indiegogo Campaign to print Galaxion: Volume 3 two days ago, and I've hardly gotten anything done since then due to compulsively checking the page. It's like being a new webcomic all over again, with that need to get an update on your stats every minute.

We're doing a flexible campaign (meaning we'll get a portion of the pledged money no matter what) so there isn't really the desperate need to reach the funding goal, but there is still the fear of failure hanging over your head. And the impossible-to-resist impulse to compare yourself to the super-successful Kickstarters that have raised funds to like 400% of their goal or whatever.

So far so good. Two days in and we've passed the halfway point, which is loads better than I was expecting. But I don't think I'm going to survive the next 32 days without imploding from stress. Wink
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Marscaleb



Joined: 28 Aug 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well if you want a crowd-funding campaign to be successful it needs to be a full-time job.

...Why can't you just use print on demand?
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ttallan
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I could have and I have in the past used print on demand. I used to think of POD as the non-professional way of printing, for people who couldn't sell enough copies to do a "real" print run, but I've since talked to some people who make a living off their webcomics who exclusively use print on demand. So I may go back to it one day.

But I still like offset printing because for black and white the images are so much more crisp. Also, I like being able to put the emboss and gold foil enhancements on the cover, and you can't do that with POD.
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Marscaleb



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I won't debate that formal printing makes a work feel more official, but honestly, unless you're popular enough to show up in a Barnes and Noble, I kinda find it limiting.
With the formal printing you only get so many copies. People who find your comic later can't get a printed copy if they are all sold out. People who want a printed copy now but don't have the money until later also can't buy them if they are all sold out. They kind of become a "you had to be there" experience, which can become a real bummer for a lot of folks. I finally have a little bit of cash but I can't buy the first two Dr. McNinja books. I don't stand a chance of buying anything older like Melonpool or early Sluggy.

Perhaps the best solution is to do a formal print and then switch over to POD once those are all sold, but nobody ever seems to have that mindset. Instead we got all these comic that people can't buy.

...Do us a favor and set an example for the rest of us, will ya?
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Casual Notice
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ttallan wrote:
I used to think of POD as the non-professional way of printing, for people who couldn't sell enough copies to do a "real" print run,

I'm old enough and have been writing long enough that I remember when any self-publishing option was considered resorting to a vanity press and therefore unprofessional.

Of course, I'm mostly a traditional print writer, and (with the notable exception of the tinfoil hat crowd) indy press hasn't made as many inroads into that field as it has into the realm of graphic storytelling.

Anyway, good luck on your endeavor Ttallan.
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ttallan
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marscaleb wrote:
Perhaps the best solution is to do a formal print and then switch over to POD once those are all sold, but nobody ever seems to have that mindset. Instead we got all these comic that people can't buy.

Well, one of the good things that these Kickstarter/Indiegogo campaigns seem to be bringing to the popular webcomics (the recent wildly successful Girl Genius campaign, for example) is the ability to raise enough extra funds to reprint those older titles. Frankly, big publishers who sell books in Barnes and Noble run into the same problem. There are plenty of great titles that fall out of print because they ran out of stock, and can't be bothered to reprint. And the authors' hands are frequently tied. At least this way, control over what gets reprinted is in the hands of the creators.

Which is not to say POD isn't the solution to everything. Soon, perhaps. But not yet. Printing quality and cost-per-unit hasn't quite got there.

Casual Notice wrote:
Anyway, good luck on your endeavor Ttallan.

Aaaah! That phrase is like the kiss of death!
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nsanelilmunky



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I keep forgetting IndieGoGo exists Razz

Any reason for them instead of kickstarter?
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kickstarter is limited to US campaigns.
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ttallan
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, you have to be American (and a US resident, to be precise) to run a Kickstarter campaign. Or British, I think the UK was added recently. The rest of the world (including Canada) uses Indiegogo.

But Americans might choose Indiegogo because they have the option of a "flexible" campaign, meaning you can still receive the money (less a certain percentage) if you don't make your target. With Kickstarter, I believe, it's all or nothing. That percentage you get to keep is higher if you reach your target, though, so there is still an incentive to reach your target funding level.
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nsanelilmunky



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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^^And UK.

I guess I forgot that they were in Canada.
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4LS



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welp, I've ordered my copy Wink

ttallan wrote:

But Americans might choose Indiegogo because they have the option of a "flexible" campaign, meaning you can still receive the money (less a certain percentage) if you don't make your target.

I was wondering why you had those targets at lower funding levels - after getting used to Kickstarter, that had me confused.
How useful is it, though? As I would assume that with Kickstarter, you just set the funding target to the minimum requirement anyway ... or is there evidence that people stop giving as much if the official target has been passed, so it's better to take a risk and aim big?
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Kail



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

4LS wrote:

How useful is it, though? As I would assume that with Kickstarter, you just set the funding target to the minimum requirement anyway ... or is there evidence that people stop giving as much if the official target has been passed, so it's better to take a risk and aim big?


I'm sure someone with more experience knows better than me, but I think some projects are going ahead regardless. I.E. if I'm making a video game in my free time, I might use the funding to upgrade my studio or something, but not getting sufficient funding isn't going to prevent the game from being made, it's just not going to be as quick. The more money you get up front, the better, obviously, but whatever you don't get you can either cover yourself or get a loan or something.

Also, there's the whole "Funding failed, only achieved pledges of $9,954 of the $10,000 goal, so you get nothing" aspect.

And obviously a cynical person would note that it's easier to fleece people this way. There are virtually no protections on this kind of deal, as far as I'm aware.
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ttallan
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are certainly projects that are going ahead regardless of the outcome. I can't imagine the Foglios not printing the latest Girl Genius volume, for example. In some ways, these campaigns are simply a more exciting way to take pre-orders. To some degree what drives these things is the incentives-- stuff that is only being offered for a limited time, so if you want to get one you have to act now. But also, you see people who are just genuinely happy to help small entrepreneurs succeed.

(Also, thank you, 4LS! Very Happy )
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Marscaleb



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

4LS wrote:
or is there evidence that people stop giving as much if the official target has been passed, so it's better to take a risk and aim big?


When I was looking at making a campaign, I initially thought they'd do better when they have that sense of urgency because "the projects NEEDS your help or it won't get off the ground!"
But when I started doing research, the sites themselves suggested that more people are interested in a project that is fully funded because it looks like its success is a sure thing.

But I kinda wonder if the stats they are looking at are a little slanted. This comes down to things that can't be quantifiably studied. Some project just get more attention, some projects are just more of something people want to see happen. Truth be told, there's a dozen other aspects that will have greater influence on a person deciding to donate or not; how much money has been funded is not going to make or break a person's donation.
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CardboardCrack



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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This looks to be going well. Congrats, you should be happy!
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