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Guide to knowing your local dialect

 
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Marscaleb



Joined: 28 Aug 2012
Posts: 255

PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 8:38 pm    Post subject: Guide to knowing your local dialect Reply with quote

When planning where my comic takes place, I made a point that it wasn't on the East coast, because I didn't want to accidentally use my West coast terms and seem out of place.

With that in mind, I thought people here might be interested in knowing how certain terms are used in various parts of the United States.

Very interesting, to say the least.

http://spark-1590165977.us-west-2.elb.amazonaws.com/jkatz/SurveyMaps/

This shows you color-coded maps to distinguish certain aspects of our dialects across the nation.
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ttallan
Postpostpostpostpost!


Joined: 28 Feb 2008
Posts: 1128
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I first came across this, I must have spent 20 minutes muttering to myself: "Been. Been? Beeeeeen. Been. Pecan? Pee-cahn? Pic-ahn?..."

When I moved from NJ to Toronto I learned to say "pop" instead of "soda" and "running shoes" instead of "sneakers." Most people tell me they'd never guess I was from Jersey based on my accent, but sometimes I wonder if I can hear my roots when I talk...
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SamuraiTaiga



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting and very useful. Why is there a big red spot in the middle though?
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Casual Notice
Spambot Extraordinaire


Joined: 18 Mar 2005
Posts: 2962
Location: Oh my God, It's full of stars!

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SamuraiTaiga wrote:
Why is there a big red spot in the middle though?

I'm going to guess that it's because the Greater St. Louis Metropolitan Area refers to "soft drinks" as "sodas."

I did notice some question format errors that skewed the maps. For instance, in over thirty years living in Texas, I have never once heard anyone refer to New York as "the city;" they tend to use that appellation to denote the nearest large-scale metropolis (using in town to denote their nearest minor population center).

This is, of course, the problem with any survey. The data are not empirical, because the expectations of the experimenter are expressed in the questions posed and often alter the responses from the natural response that pure observation would suggest.
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Varethane



Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 559

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Huh, I grew up in Toronto and I think people here use 'pop' and 'soda' interchangeably-- since I tend to only drink it when I have friends over, I tend to call it whatever they're calling it, and I have a hard time remembering that there even is a 'correct' term in my region (and which it is).

I tend to not notice differences in pronunciation unless they come along with some distinctive accent, though; otherwise they just kind of get filed under 'oh hey, a different way to enunciate 'pecan', maybe I'll say it like that next time'. Maybe it comes of living in a big city where everyone comes from a different background...
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nsanelilmunky



Joined: 12 Nov 2012
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The maps like that are interesting, but don't really do much to explain the individual dialects of the areas shown. This page has some good information and links on the bottom to youtube videos so you can hear it, but it still doesn't get into some of it.

For example, These maps are pretty general. There's actually an influx of German grammar in my area due to the heritage of the majority population here. I have yet to see any of these linguist sites get into those types of studies. They're always interested in pronunciation.
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SamuraiTaiga



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm curious about the intonation patterns in different regions, particularly differences between sexes. Those are rarely discussed, but it's noticeable to my ear. Especially the way women speak. English teachers seem to be stuck pretending that there's no difference between female and male intonation. They want to pretend English has no gender differences in different regions.
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mcmasters



Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 436

PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whatever I speak, that's what Pete and his crew will be stuck with. I'm from Houston, but I've always assumed my accent to be more generic American urban than "southern." It certainly doesn't have any long slow drawl to it, though we do say "y'all."

I wonder why the St. Louis area stood out so prominently...the map is blurring fine distinctions but even with that it looks like St. Louis is ground zero for a nuclear attack. Not sure why it's so wildly different than, say, Cincinnati.

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www.mcmasterscomics.com
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mcmasters



Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 436

PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nsanelilmunky wrote:
The maps like that are interesting, but don't really do much to explain the individual dialects of the areas shown. This page has some good information and links on the bottom to youtube videos so you can hear it, but it still doesn't get into some of it.


Thanks for posting, that is an intense site! I don't know if have sensitive enough ears to pick out the small distinctions. I can't help seeing a site like that and thinking how amazing the internet is. Imagine someone trying to get the depth of that info- audio in this case- fifteen year ago.
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SamuraiTaiga



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too true, the internet speeds up more than just news and gossip. It's an intelligence booster, not merely a wonderful distraction.
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Justinfh



Joined: 30 Sep 2012
Posts: 87

PostPosted: Wed Jun 12, 2013 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I live in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, and we have our own distinct dialect. Actually, in more urban areas, it's not as strong. I avoid Newfoundlandland dialect in my Webcomic because nobody would understand what's being said.


For example:

Yes b'y, Yes boy. (Expression of awe, disbelief, or sarcasm. Also commonly used sarcastically to mean yeah right).

You're some crooked, You are grouchy.

Click here for more information for Newfoundland English.

Click here for my Webcomic.
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Lo (Aquapunk)



Joined: 09 Oct 2009
Posts: 45

PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SamuraiTaiga wrote:
I'm curious about the intonation patterns in different regions, particularly differences between sexes. Those are rarely discussed, but it's noticeable to my ear. Especially the way women speak. English teachers seem to be stuck pretending that there's no difference between female and male intonation. They want to pretend English has no gender differences in different regions.


While this is true--you should have seen the face of a deaf friend I had in HS when we told her--, and I noticed it when I moved from So Cal (where everyone speaks relatively low and lax) to NYC, what does linguistics have to do with your typical English class?
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Marscaleb



Joined: 28 Aug 2012
Posts: 255

PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Justinfh wrote:
I live in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, and we have our own distinct dialect. Actually, in more urban areas, it's not as strong. I avoid Newfoundlandland dialect in my Webcomic because nobody would understand what's being said.


For example:

Yes b'y, Yes boy. (Expression of awe, disbelief, or sarcasm. Also commonly used sarcastically to mean yeah right).

You're some crooked, You are grouchy.


Yeah I definitely wouldn't be able to follow that.
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minki



Joined: 23 Jun 2013
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aw, shame that it's limited to the US. Got a west European setting in mind myself. A dialect guide would really come in handy.
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