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After the volcano.
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Casual Notice
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:45 am    Post subject: After the volcano. Reply with quote

Okay, dcrc's question to the forum in this thread here gave me an odd idea for a jam. Here's the concept. On September 25, 2010, the Yellowstone supervolcano will erupt. Each day after the participants post a strip or a page of people getting by (or not) in thier home area.

You can use the time before hand to establish your characters if you want.

If the jam gets big enough, I'll mirror it on my site.

Ideas, comments?
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Kallisti



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually think this is a fantastic idea. I'll swing back by in a few days and throw some ideas at it.
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Zoe Robinson
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds good. I'm in.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sweet! Here's some pre-event occurrances to get folks going.

Event (E) - 14 days to E-day
  • E-14 (September 11) Nearby ranchers in Wyoming and Montana complain of depredations on their herds from the Park wolves.
  • E-12 (September 13) Wildlife spotters report reduced counts of all park species except migratory birds.
  • E-9 (September 16) The period between eruptions of Old Faithful is measured at 54 minutes.
  • E-5 (September 20) Access to hot springs and geiser beds is closed after an unexpected sulfur cloud kills five tourists and one of the Park's herds of elk. Nearby towns and ranches are advised to evacuate in case of a "minor event."
  • E-3 (September 22) Satellite monitors and local altimeters report a 15 to 25-inch (36.75 to 61.25cm) rise in ground surface parkwide. Cities and towns within 50 miles of the park are placed under a full evacuation order; locations between 50 and 100 miles are placed under voluntary evacuation status.
  • E-1 (September 24) Satellite mages show the hot springs and Yellowstone Lake to be completely dry. Radio contact with the main ranger station and the USGS station are lost.

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Luke



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that this is a really good idea. I'll try to keep along with it.

If there is a lot of participation then I think that this could be really fantastic.

Off to research the effects of a supervolcano :]

EDIT: here's a kind of cool video about it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Vn6kxfD3Ek
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, History Channel always uses worst possible outcome from the models. I'm aiming a little lower than that, but it's a good outside line for events.

Although if there are any comickers in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, or western Utah or Idaho who don't want their comic to be nothingbut a rush of hot ash ten to thirty minutes after the event, you guys can pick another location. Heck, I'm going to have enough fun just doing Houston, since we're likely to recieve something like 5-10 feet of dust and pebbles (although not the full pyroclastic flow that will decimate the Eastern Slope of the Rockies).
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So by the sound of this, we're going for something bigger than Mount Tambora but smaller than Toba, right? Has anybody found a site that has a region-by-region breakdown of the effects?
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't found a site that breaks down the effects but it seems that anyone outside of the North American continent is going to have to do one of three things:

1. Post a strip about how people in their area are affected by North America effectively disappearing.
2. Post a strip about the effects a rapidly changing climate is having in their area (see 1816, The Year Without a Summer* for a good idea about what will happen).
3. Move their characters to somewhere more affected.

I think I'm going to try mixing up 1 and 2.

* Damn, that's a good title for a comic!
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find myself wondering if the static discharge effects of a large volcanic cloud (which would cover the world eventually) would play havoc on communications and satellite functions.

Also, from what I gather the west coast of North America, protected by the bulk of the rockies and the prevailing winds, would be the last part of the Northern Hemisphere hit.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Casual Notice wrote:
I find myself wondering if the static discharge effects of a large volcanic cloud (which would cover the world eventually) would play havoc on communications and satellite functions.


That's a very good point. Thankfully most communications are now fibreoptic (which is why SETI initiatives are having to be reworked - we are almost undetectable from space now, so other civilizations are probably the same) but satellite functions are screwed.
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Kallisti



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I'm about 1500 miles away from the nexus of the blast... which is good... but I'm downwind... which is not. Yeah, I suspect my leg of the comic is going to be about my characters stocking up as much supplies as they can from an under-siege walmart.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zoe Robinson wrote:
Casual Notice wrote:
I find myself wondering if the static discharge effects of a large volcanic cloud (which would cover the world eventually) would play havoc on communications and satellite functions.


That's a very good point. Thankfully most communications are now fibreoptic (which is why SETI initiatives are having to be reworked - we are almost undetectable from space now, so other civilizations are probably the same) but satellite functions are screwed.


I was thinking in terms of cell phones and satellite communications, and GPS, DMA, and even (to a certain extent) magnetic navigation. With no stars or real idea of the position of the sun for navigation, ships, planes, even truck drivers would be increasingly dependent on these questionable methods of navigating (if the insane interference caused by the Icelandic glass cloud earlier this year is any indication).

Also, the US provides a quarter of the world's food, and Canada and Mexico are major players in the oil market.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've done a few days of focused research and hopefull by tomorrow will have a map made of the immediate (by which I mean Day One) effects (broken down into 5 zones).

This is the information I've been able to gather.
  • The west coast of North America will be fully protected from pyroclastic flow and largely protected from airborne pyroclastics by the Rocky Mountains and the prevailing winds.
  • Between largescale earth movement and pyroclastics, everything within 100 miles of the epicenter will be erased.
  • Airborne pyroclastics will fall across the continent spreading mostly east by southeast, the farther away, the smaller and cooler the falls will be. Houston, for instance, can expect up to five feet (1.52 m) of dust and rock up to about the size of a canteloupe, while New York will get maybe 6 inches of dust.
  • The ash cloiud should reach Europe by E+3.

If anyone has contradictory of moderating info, let me know. Otherwise, that's what the first map will be based on.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the map of immediate pyroclastic problems. Key below.

Key
  • RED--Limit (as far as I can tell) of pyroclastic flow. Eastward extension marks my best guess for the location of the Missouri river valley which will act as a channel. Nothing here will survive. Think Pompeii and Herculaneum.
  • ORANGE--Large airborne pyroclastics (boulders up to the size of small buildings, unaffected by air currents but partially blocked by mountains), beginning within minutes of the event and continuing with diminishing size and density until the end of the initial eruption (32hours or so?). All pyroclastics will be upwards of 500 degrees Farenheit (292 C). Survival is prohibitively unlikely.
  • YELLOW--Medium-sized airborne pyroclastics (boulders up to the size of cars, largely unaffected by air currents) beginning 30 mins to an hour after the event and diminishing in size and density for most of the eruption period (24 hours?). Most pyroclastics will still be extremely hot. Widespread ground fires. Survival is unlikely, and survival without relocating is probably impossible.
  • GREEN--Small airborne pyroclastics (rocks and pebbles up to the size of watermelons, partially driven by wind currents), beginning 1-4 hours after the event and continuing for 12 or so hours. Some pyroclastics will still be hot enough to cause scattered fires. Survival is extremely difficult.
  • BLUE--Tiny airborne pyroclastics (sand and small pebbles, heavily driven by wind currents), beginning 3-6 hours after the event and continuing for 1-6 hours depending on a variety of factors. Few, if any, will be hot enough to cause fires. Survival is likely.

The Dust Cloud: Techincally pyroclastic debris, it will, as far as I can tell, spread slowly over the Northern Hemisphere, originally following the wind currents but billowing out as density demands. Within about a month it will cover the planet and will remain (although it will start dissipating as soon as the volcano stops belching out smoke) for between five to ten years. Initial effect will be unseasonal warming increasing with density (due to the conductive heat of the ash particles) followed by global cooling. And darkenss. It will be dark. If you've ever been in a mood indigo storm...that's how dark.

The Shockwave: Extrapolating from the shockwave effect of known volcanic events, I believe the shockwave will be perceiveable as at least a sound worldwide. It is possible that it will cause Pacific tidal waves. It is likely that it will cause heavy damage ahead of the pyroclastics within a five hundred mile radius and light damage within a thousand miles. Thereafter it will dissipate in intensity. The shockwave will travel at the speed of sound (appr 768 mph/1236 kph). I can work up a map or bullet list fr the shockwave, if anyone asks.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heres hoping FEMA are on the ball
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