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Why a webcomic?
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MindChimera



Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 317

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:01 am    Post subject: Why a webcomic? Reply with quote

I was wondering what everyone's reasons for making a webcomic are. There's a lot of different media around, like books and videos. What made you choose making a webcomic over some other type of media? And what inspired/persuaded you to even make it at all?

For me, I think a webcomic is just a great fit. I've been writing stories and drawing for as long as I can remember, and I also have a great deal of fun making websites. So if I burn myself out on drawing pages, writing chapters, or managing the site, I can just move onto one of the other tasks and stay productive while still greatly enjoying myself.

The only thing I'm not enjoying so far is advertising. Confused

The story I have I've had floating around in my mind for a long time, and only recently started polishing it up to share with others. So it's really exciting to have it out for other people to (hopefully) enjoy. I'd been considering writing a book, but for the kind of story I'm going for, I think a webcomic works better.

What about you guys? Why do you make a webcomic (or webcomics!) and what do you enjoy about it?
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JohnK



Joined: 02 May 2006
Posts: 477
Location: Glendale, California

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 6:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really enjoy writing comics, so much that I never even have time to write short stories anymore. I love doing things in a visual manner. For me it's this wonderful center between film and books, but better. You can do more than film can in a way because there really isn't much of a budget and nobody is going to compromise your work. There's an extra thrill for me because I'm no artist, so i get to see how the artists i work with interpret what I do.

It's just fun all around, and you can do whatever the hell you want.
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Lo (Aquapunk)



Joined: 09 Oct 2009
Posts: 45

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Low to non-existent overhead, comparatively easy distribution, complete control of the finished product.

That's what mostly does it for me. Oh and I guess the medium itself has a fascinating history and some really great things have come out of it, and telling the same kind of story via traditional illustration would just plain suck.
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nsanelilmunky



Joined: 12 Nov 2012
Posts: 120

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been drawing since before I could read. Seriously, that's how my mom got me to behave in places was by giving me some paper and a pencil and letting me go to town.

Other than that (or maybe because of that) I find it hard to describe the things I see in my head. It's easier to draw that I see and go from there. I just wish I drew faster because I have a ton of stories in my head waiting to get out, but I'm still stuck here refining my drawing and training myself to go all digital so that I don't have an endless search for a scanner.

I was a bit inspired by my friend though. She kinda' introduced me to webcomics and a lot of the stuff that goes into it. She also helps me with art when I ask her about it.. whether critiques or pointers on a medium. She's a lot farther along with comics than I am too. She already has a whole chapter of her first comic online, even if it hasn't updated for a while. She's about to graduate from MCAD with a degree in comic art, so her senior project eats up a lot of her time.
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ttallan
Postpostpostpostpost!


Joined: 28 Feb 2008
Posts: 1128
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, it was an easy choice for me. In the '90s I was publishing Galaxion as Diamond-distributed comic books, before I took a break to be a mom. When I came back in 2006, it was clear self-published floppy comics were no longer viable and web was the place to be. And I've been here ever since.

It's certainly been an adjustment for me, but I suppose learning how to best make comics work on the web is something all of us webcomickers struggle with, not just those who came saddled with preconceived notions of how to build a comic business the old fashioned way.
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Lavenderbard
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Joined: 12 Sep 2006
Posts: 840
Location: Ohio

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sometimes a story wants to be told in pictures.
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QueenAmanda



Joined: 20 Jan 2012
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually have a story about this! My webcomic took me seven years to launch.

Because for the first year, I thought it was going to be a novel.

But then I was like, no, it would be better to do it as a web series. But then I realized I didn't have equipment or crew or costumes or anything, so I went back to the novel idea. For some reason, I started a blog for my characters around this time that I quickly abandoned... I actually converted it to the site my webcomic currently sits on, but I'm ahead of myself.

So, I went a few years alternating between Mistress Deathspike being a novel or a movie. Then I realized both of these ideas were dumb for the purposes of marketing - sure, you can sell tickets to a Batman movie or people will buy a Batman novel, but people know who Batman is. Nobody's heard of my supervillain main character.

So, year six. I decided to do a graphic novel. That lasted three days until I realized, no. This has been in my brain for six years and the world must be in on it. Webcomic.

So I spent a year writing it and finding an artist and all that fun stuff.

And that's why a webcomic. Because after six years, I got impatient.
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vaslittlecrow



Joined: 01 Aug 2005
Posts: 754

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been doing underground comics since I was 15. I started doing webcomics because people asked me to put my print stuff online. It's nothing too exciting.
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mcmasters



Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 436

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the way each comic is a final product. I'm one of those people who has the half-written novel, the half-written screenplay, etc., and knows that none of them are really good enough to see the light of day even if I finish them. But the webcomic, boom, here's my product. And then here's another and another. I don't know why I find that satisfying; compensation for not being able to see to the end other projects I suppose.

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www.mcmasterscomics.com
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MindChimera



Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 317

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JohnK wrote:
There's an extra thrill for me because I'm no artist, so i get to see how the artists i work with interpret what I do.


To me, it's kind of a scary idea to put my creation in the hands of someone else, haha. If I worked with someone else, I'd probably have so many notes for every detail on every page.

nsanelilmunky wrote:
I just wish I drew faster because I have a ton of stories in my head waiting to get out, but I'm still stuck here refining my drawing and training myself to go all digital so that I don't have an endless search for a scanner.

I agree, haha. I have a bunch of stories I want to do but I can only really focus on one at a time since drawing takes a good deal of time. Is buying a scanner out of the question?

ttallan wrote:
Oh, it was an easy choice for me. In the '90s I was publishing Galaxion as Diamond-distributed comic books, before I took a break to be a mom. When I came back in 2006, it was clear self-published floppy comics were no longer viable and web was the place to be. And I've been here ever since.

That's interesting! So are you liking the webcomic format more?

QueenAmanda wrote:
And that's why a webcomic. Because after six years, I got impatient.

Haha, even if it took a while, it sounds like you finally got the last push you needed to make a decision though. Wink
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smbhax.com
No! Don't post it there!


Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 2965
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried making animated videos at first but it was hard to get people to look at them--webcomics had a much better sort of infrastructure set up to get people finding your work.
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Midtoon



Joined: 20 Apr 2009
Posts: 189
Location: California, USA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

IN my case, I wanted to write and draw a traditional comic in the newspaper, but I could not develop the speed to do it daily. One day, a thief stole my laptop (while my external hard drive with the backups was broken) and I lost almost a year of work. That's when I decided to do a webcomic, so that no one could steal it from me again.
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JuleaKinslayer



Joined: 13 Feb 2013
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a story I really wanted to tell and just didn't feel that a novel was the right format. I always had some artistic talent but never really developed it. I've spent the past two years getting to the skill level I have now and a long ways yet to go... anyway, the graphic novel format is, I think, the best for the story I want to tell.
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Casual Notice
Spambot Extraordinaire


Joined: 18 Mar 2005
Posts: 2968
Location: Oh my God, It's full of stars!

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disney backed out of the seven-picture deal they'd originally offered me.
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ttallan
Postpostpostpostpost!


Joined: 28 Feb 2008
Posts: 1128
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MindChimera wrote:

ttallan wrote:
Oh, it was an easy choice for me. In the '90s I was publishing Galaxion as Diamond-distributed comic books, before I took a break to be a mom. When I came back in 2006, it was clear self-published floppy comics were no longer viable and web was the place to be. And I've been here ever since.

That's interesting! So are you liking the webcomic format more?

I think on the whole I do like it more. I like not having to spend the money up front to print, although I do miss the credibility you get from having your book appear in comic shops all over the country. When you're just online, it's more difficult to be taken seriously. Having weekly (or even daily) interactions with readers is also great, compared with the handful of letters (with whole paragraphs! On actual paper! Delivered by Canada Post to my IRL mailbox!) that came along every two months. If I'd had the same set-up then as I do now, I might not have needed to step away from comics completely for six years. I could have just made a blog post explaining what was going on and get pages up when I could. In the periodical publishing system, there was much less tolerance for creators who consistently blew their deadlines (probably because it was more difficult to get the word out why you needed to, so people just assumed you were lazy).
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